Transfering magic to a stage, lesson 1 visibility

I perform every month at a show in Amsterdam called “the Amsterdam magic show”. It is a wonderful show with all different kinds of magic.

I started to perform at this show as a close-up magician and I only used to do close-up magic.

However, about 8 months ago Fritz pushed me to make an act for the parlor and since then I have been really enjoying parlor magic. I started to perform parlor magic with just a rubrics cube act and even though, I’m not as satisfied with the act today, it used to be a really fun act to perform.

While looking at the stage, I started to look for different effects to perform and how I can transfer effects from close-up to stage. I came to a few discoveries which I think will be useful for everyone.

The first one was that everyone should get a sense of what is going on. Let's say that I am performing a card effect on stage, everyone should be able to see it or at least get a sense of what is going on in the routine.

This means that I started to think about ways to make certain things more visible, for example, if I spread a deck of cards, I won’t spread them at my crotch. I will spread the cards in a vertical manner at my side, this helps a lot with the visibility of the spread.

When we are dealing with selections it is always a good plan to call out the selection if the routine allows it, since this will confirm the complete image in the audience's mind and it takes less time for them to figure out what card it is.

If the routine doesn't allow me to call out the selection I like to force a visible card like the 2 of hearts, as everyone can easily identify this card from a distance.

I can go on to explain for a long time how and why I would do things, but the bottom line is making sure that you can bring the magic from the crotch (down there) to the face (up here). This helps a lot with visibility and it can change a card trick from playing for a small group to a card trick playing for a big room of people.

-Rico

 


2 comments


  • Ken aka Magi-Ken

    Yes. I remember having taught this to a junior high-school student and high-school (10th grade) student who had entered a high-school talent contest show with two nightly performances for an audience of about 3,000 at each show. The high-school drama teacher called me in to make the necessary changes in their act; changing small things either into larger versions or better displayed ones; and turning some tricks they repeatedly failed at in the auditions into deliberate and funny intentional humor. That was over 50 years ago, back when I was president of our high-school magic club and in 11th grade myself. The younger protege and I became great friends and he went on to become a full-time magic professional too. EVERYTHING just needs to be put into perspective. Or as one magical cliché puts it, make it “Play big and pack small.”


  • Ken aka Magi-Ken

    Yes. I remember having taught this to a junior high-school student and high-school (10th grade) student who had entered a high-school talent contest show with two nightly performances for an audience of about 3,000 at each show. The high-school drama teacher called me in to make the necessary changes in their act; changing small things either into larger versions or better displayed ones; and turning some tricks they repeatedly failed at in the auditions into deliberate and funny intentional humor. That was over 50 years ago, back when I was president of our high-school magic club and in 11th grade myself. The younger protege and I became great friends and he went on to become a full-time magic professional too. EVERYTHING just needs to be put into perspective. Or as one magical cliche puts it, make it “Play big and pack small.”


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